Three Ways to Hang a Small Quilt

Here are three ways to hang a small quilt. I hang most of my quilts using simple straight pins—I tap them in at a downward angle, leaving just enough of the pin out to catch the hangers.

  1.  Use curtain rings.  If you crochet, you can single crochet around the ring with #10 crochet thread.  Sew the rings to the back of the quilt, sewing one to each corner.  I sewed down the bottom of the ring, leaving the top part free.  Hang on straight pins.
Quilt Hanger

Quilt Hanger

2. Flat molding.  I purchase a long piece of pre-primed, flat molding, apprx 1-1/8 inches wide, 1/8-inch thick and cut it to the length I need.  Sand and paint the cut edges.  Sometimes I drill a hole in either end and insert it in a quilt sleeve.  The molding needs to be longer than the sleeve so that you can access the holes for hanging.  For my 8-1/2 inch wide quilt, I sewed two triangles to the back of the quilt.  Fold a 3-inch square in half, wrong sides together, and baste the raw edges less than ¼-inch from the edge to the corners before attaching your binding.  If you forget, you can still attach the triangles before you stitch the binding down on the back.  For this quilt I also pounded in a saw-tooth picture hanger.  The problem was the points went through to the back and I asked my husband to sand them off since I couldn’t snip them off or pound them in.  This can be a little tricky, depending on how careful you are with the sander.

Reverse with hanger

Reverse with hanger

Reverse of Quilt Hanger

Reverse of Quilt Hanger

3. If you have some scrap paneling and access to a power saw, you can rip off the size hanger you need.  Here again, cut your wood longer than the quilt sleeve and drill a hole in each end.  This next bit of information may no longer be accurate but years ago it was suggested that you paint or varnish the wood because chemicals could leach onto your quilt and stain it. I’m not sure if this refers to treated lumber (which I wouldn’t use) or something natural in unfinished wood.  If anyone can verify this or debunk it, please send me a comment.

Quilt Hanger

Quilt Hanger

Quilt Hanger in Sleeve

Quilt Hanger in Sleeve

BONUS: Here’s a link to a tutorial by Amy Hodge for another method.

http://www.amyalamode.com/blog/2012/01/18/how-to-hang-a-quilt-tutorial/

It is deer season here already–not the hunting part, but the prep part.  My husband has a tree stand in Minnesota and he wanted to leave the frame set up so he took the roof cover off and brought it home.  He decided to add Velcro along the edges and was just having a heckofa time with the thread breaking.  After about five times of rethreading for him, I asked if he wanted me to do it.  No way.  Anyway, I figured out it was the Velcro shredding the thread so then he felt better and even finally managed to rethread it himself.  I asked him to save the threads–this is my current black thread collection, Velcro and a piece of camo.  A job well done!

Deer Stand Cover

Deer Stand Cover

Coming Soon: The 8-1/2×11 Challenge (finished), Surface Embellishing with Embroidery, Thread and Needle Tips, FMQ Tips, and The Miniature Hexie Project.

About icandyet.com

Hi—I’m Candy P. I live in beautiful Northwest Arkansas and write this blog about quilting. I love the entire process of quilting from design to piecing and appliqué, to free-motion quilting on my Janome. I have been sewing since I was five and started quilting in 1991 with a group in NE Minnesota. We used cardboard templates and scissors and did everything by hand. I have since made traditional quilts, donation quilts and Quilts of Valor; I’ve done paper piecing and foundation quilting but now really enjoy improvisational piecing using scraps from my stash or my hand dyed fabrics and making art quilts. I am also currently trying to finish any and all unfinished projects. I am so far behind I can never die. I have always been a maker, a sewist and needleworker, running the gamut from hand embroidery to macramé, knitting, crocheting, crafts, book binding and mixed media projects. I have taught a lot of handicraft classes including fabric painting, origami, and calligraphy, Dancercise (who remembers that) and my own exercise classes. When I’m not in the garage dyeing fabric or in my studio, I’m at Zumba or walking on local trails and photographing art or whatever catches my eye. I currently belong to Crystal Bridges, AQS, The Quilt Show, NWA Modern Quilt Guild and the Van Go-Go Girls (a local art quilt group). I occasionally make it to the piano and the golf course and enjoy cooking with my husband and generally wreaking some kind of havoc with my daughter. You can read my previous blog at Kandykwilts.blogspot.com but you cannot read my blog as northwind at The Quilt Show, apparently lost forever. I write about my current projects, mistakes and all, and often tell you what products I use (with no compensation). I am open to suggestions about blog posts and will be happy to answer any questions you may have about my projects or posts. Comment or email me. Feedback is most welcome—just be kind.

Posted on September 20, 2015, in quilt techniques and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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