The Grandmother’s Flower Garden Project

Time to spray baste The Grandmother’s Flower Garden Project (and Gelato, as well).  It’s a cool morning, no wind, so I haul out my table and 4×8 piece of insulation.  I place my backings down, right side down, and pin.  I have decided to try not stretching the backing to make it super tight (tight enough to have no wrinkles), pin the corners and then the edges.  Next place the batting on, spray one side, flip and smooth it out.  Then spray the other side.  (For larger projects, fold half of the batting back, spray, smooth, and then repeat with the other half of the batting.) Next smooth the top onto the batting, remove the pins and bring it all inside.  TIP: It is best to spray your batting instead of the backing or top as the spray CAN affect the fabric with spots or stains.  I always spray outside and wear a mask just in case a breeze comes up–this only protects from direct spray, not the fumes.  I practice holding my breath while I spray and then run around the corner when I run out of air.  Not recommended for pregnant women and use a respirator if you have respiratory difficulties.

Spray Basting Quilts

Spray Basting Quilts

I had already spray basted my tablerunner (Gelato) but decided the batting was too fluffy and changed it out for Thermolam.  Gelato is one of the projects I spray basted last summer with June Tailor Quilt Basting Spray, anticipating a winter of quilting (haha).  The layers were still holding together well.  INFO: Some sprays are very temporary and I believe 505 will hold together for five years. Here is the backing, which needs to be smoothed out as you can see.

Smoothing backing

Smoothing backing

I usually smooth out the back, smooth out the front, smooth out the back, and then smooth out the front again.  For an all-over free-motion quilting design, you can just start in the center and work on one quarter of the quilt at a time. I don’t roll up the side of the quilt that is in the machine bed–I just scrunch it up. One last check to make sure the quilt is square–measure from one diagonal to the other and then measure the other diagonal.  They should be the same–if not, reposition until it is.  43-3/4 inches in both directions–I win.

Measuring on diagonal

Measuring on diagonal

Measuring on diagonal

Measuring on diagonal

Because I will be turning the quilt a lot, I place four pins–you don’t have to close the pins–then quilt around the center hexie and the other four hexies, removing pins as you go.

Pin basting

Pin basting

Quilting

Quilting

After that I resmooth both sides, pin another set, quilt, repeat.

Oops

Oops

Oops–I missed a point on the edge–will have to stitch that down by hand before I finish..

P1020456

I have finished three rows, weaving in thread ends as I go.  That’s enough for the day.  God forbid that I should have nothing to do tomorrow.

Update: I have finished quilting around each green hexie–only took me two days.   That’s the good news.  The bad news is that the flower rows are not lying flat so I’ll have to quilt around the flower centers as well.  Then I will stitch very closely to the outer edge and either echo or free-motion quilt some kind of design in the border.

My next post will include photos from the Jamie Wyeth exhibit, some of which were painted on corrugated cardboard, one of the artist’s favorite mediums.  I’m calling it, “Keepin’ ’em down on the farm.”  Till then, find something to crow about.

About icandyet.com

Hi—I’m Candy P. I live in beautiful Northwest Arkansas and write this blog about quilting. I love the entire process of quilting from design to piecing and appliqué, to free-motion quilting on my Janome. I have been sewing since I was five and started quilting in 1991 with a group in NE Minnesota. We used cardboard templates and scissors and did everything by hand. I have since made traditional quilts, donation quilts and Quilts of Valor; I’ve done paper piecing and foundation quilting but now really enjoy improvisational piecing using scraps from my stash or my hand dyed fabrics and making art quilts. I am also currently trying to finish any and all unfinished projects. I am so far behind I can never die. I have always been a maker, a sewist and needleworker, running the gamut from hand embroidery to macramé, knitting, crocheting, crafts, book binding and mixed media projects. I have taught a lot of handicraft classes including fabric painting, origami, and calligraphy, Dancercise (who remembers that) and my own exercise classes. When I’m not in the garage dyeing fabric or in my studio, I’m at Zumba or walking on local trails and photographing art or whatever catches my eye. I currently belong to Crystal Bridges, AQS, The Quilt Show, NWA Modern Quilt Guild and the Van Go-Go Girls (a local art quilt group). I occasionally make it to the piano and the golf course and enjoy cooking with my husband and generally wreaking some kind of havoc with my daughter. You can read my previous blog at Kandykwilts.blogspot.com but you cannot read my blog as northwind at The Quilt Show, apparently lost forever. I write about my current projects, mistakes and all, and often tell you what products I use (with no compensation). I am open to suggestions about blog posts and will be happy to answer any questions you may have about my projects or posts. Comment or email me. Feedback is most welcome—just be kind.

Posted on October 1, 2015, in English Paper-Piecing and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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