Tutorial: Printing Quilt Labels

You can print out my directions for printing quilt labels on your home computer by clicking on the link.

InstructionsLabels.BubbleJet

I will show you step by step photographs in the post, but first we should talk about what information you should put on your label.

Why make a label for your quilt?  If you give your quilt as a gift, a label can denote a special occasion such as a birthday, wedding or baby gift.  I title my quilts and give some details about the quilt including techniques, date finished or presented, my name/city/state, anything of historical or general interest.  I have also starting adding dimensions of the quilt.

Historical significance.  There is a lot of documentation and research being done on quilts.  You can make it easier for your descendents and researchers by labeling your quilts as you finish them.  There are some wonderful quilts out in the world with no history as to who made them, who they were given to or why they were made.  You can sometimes date a quilt by the fabrics used but it can really add interest to a quilt with specific information as to maker and date finished.  NOTE:  The date denotes the last time the quilt was worked on.  If you finish granny mommy’s quilt and add new fabrics, you must use the current date.  You can always add that the blocks were made by so-and-so in 1920, but if you added borders, backing and quilted it yesterday, you need to document the quilt as being finished in 2015.  This information may not be important to you or your kids, but it may matter to someone else down the line.  If nothing else, it is fun to know why a quilt was made.

Here’s a sample of one of my recent labels.

Quilt label

Quilt label

On to the tutorial.  Always read the directions first before starting. I”ll give you resources at the end.

Make a new document with your quilt information.  I put my page on landscape and formatted two columns.  I can usually get four labels per page this way.  Leave space between the labels so that you have at least 1/2-inch margins all around for turning under edges.  I sometimes use the enter key to shorten up each line. Set up your printer ahead of time to print best quality.

Supplies

Supplies

  1. Prepare the fabric for printing.  Cut a piece of fabric slightly more than 8-1/2×11 inches.  Shake bottle well and pour enough Bubble Jet Set 2000 into the bottom of an aluminum tray to cover the fabric.  Using rubber gloves, make sure the fabric is saturated and soak for 5 minutes.
Soaking fabric

Soaking fabric

2. Using rubber gloves, let fabric drip into tray and lay flat on an old towel.  Do not wring fabric. Pour remaining Jet Set back into bottle for reuse.

Pouring Jet Set 2000 back in bottle

Pouring Jet Set 2000 back in bottle

3. Let fabric dry.  I use a hair dryer to speed the process and then finish drying with the iron.

More tools

More tools

4. Press the shiny side of a sheet of heavy duty freezer paper to the wrong side of the fabric.

Pressing treated fabric

Pressing treated fabric

Pressing freezer paper sheet to fabric

Pressing freezer paper sheet to fabric

5. Carefully trim the fabric to 8-1/2×11 inches; press the edges again.

Trimming prepared fabric

Trimming prepared fabric

6. Place the fabric/freezer paper fabric side down in the paper tray.  (This is how my printer works–check yours.)  Print.  Let stand for 30 minutes.

Place in printer fabric side down

Place in printer fabric side down

Wait 30 minutes after printing

Wait 30 minutes after printing

7. Remove the freezer paper from the fabric, being careful not to distort the fabric.

8. Using the timer again and rubber gloves, swish the fabric in cold soapy water for 2 minutes.  Rinse until all the soap is removed.  Let the fabric drip into the tray and dry as before.

Hand wash in soapy water 2 minutes

Hand wash in soapy water 2 minutes

9. Cut your labels, leaving 1/2-inch on all sides.

10. Press under the edges.  To miter corners, open up the corners as shown, fold down a triangle and fold in each side.

Pressing, mitering corners

Pressing, mitering corners

11. Pin the label to the bottom left side of your quilt, looking at it from the back.  Blind stitch the edges down.  You now have a professional looking label and wonderful documentation for your quilt.  If you followed the directions, the label will be permanent and totally washable.

Pinning on label

Pinning on label

Resource for Bubble Jet Set 2000 and heavy duty freezer paper sheets: http://www.cjenkinscompany.com/

About icandyet.com

Hi—I’m Candy P. I live in beautiful Northwest Arkansas and write this blog about quilting. I love the entire process of quilting from design to piecing and appliqué, to free-motion quilting on my Janome. I have been sewing since I was five and started quilting in 1991 with a group in NE Minnesota. We used cardboard templates and scissors and did everything by hand. I have since made traditional quilts, donation quilts and Quilts of Valor; I’ve done paper piecing and foundation quilting but now really enjoy improvisational piecing using scraps from my stash or my hand dyed fabrics and making art quilts. I am also currently trying to finish any and all unfinished projects. I am so far behind I can never die. I have always been a maker, a sewist and needleworker, running the gamut from hand embroidery to macramé, knitting, crocheting, crafts, book binding and mixed media projects. I have taught a lot of handicraft classes including fabric painting, origami, and calligraphy, Dancercise (who remembers that) and my own exercise classes. When I’m not in the garage dyeing fabric or in my studio, I’m at Zumba or walking on local trails and photographing art or whatever catches my eye. I currently belong to Crystal Bridges, AQS, The Quilt Show, NWA Modern Quilt Guild and the Van Go-Go Girls (a local art quilt group). I occasionally make it to the piano and the golf course and enjoy cooking with my husband and generally wreaking some kind of havoc with my daughter. You can read my previous blog at Kandykwilts.blogspot.com but you cannot read my blog as northwind at The Quilt Show, apparently lost forever. I write about my current projects, mistakes and all, and often tell you what products I use (with no compensation). I am open to suggestions about blog posts and will be happy to answer any questions you may have about my projects or posts. Comment or email me. Feedback is most welcome—just be kind.

Posted on November 8, 2015, in tutorial and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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