Art Abandonment

I joined the Art Abandonment Facebook group sometime ago. In case you’re not familiar with this movement, the idea is to make small pieces of art and leave them for others to find. We always hope that the finders will let us know what they’ve done with their found art–hung it on the wall, the fridge, given it away. This does not happen often but we are all encouraged when someone lets us know that they were having a horrible day and finding a little joy in a baggie gave them hope or made them smile. I finally decided what to do and started making art cards, 5×7, suitable for framing or putting on an easel. I got a little carried away because I wasn’t sure how I wanted to quilt my placemats or the final piece for the Too Precious to Cut (But We Will) challenge. The placemats are finished now and as soon as I finish the table mat, I’ll post and give you links for the placemat tutorial and previous posts.

I have abandoner’s regret for my first piece (mostly scraps from the Cotton + Steel baggie) and I hope it made someone’s day. I left it at the Love Lock Bridge on the Lake Bella Vista trail and by the time I walked around the lake and back, it was gone. The bridge now has 13 locks (it only had six in June). It is still too hot here in the afternoons but soon I’ll be able to get back to walking on all the local trails.

House Under Milky Way

House Under Milky Way

House Under Milky Way on Love Lock Bridge, Lake Bella Vista

House Under Milky Way abandoned on Love Lock Bridge, Lake Bella Vista

I have been using up  orphan blocks and random scraps for the most part. This is a series using samples of broderie perse, fabric scraps and my hand-crocheted rick rack trim. I abandoned the first one this week at a local community center.

Fleur Rouge Carmin, Art Card #2

Fleur Rouge Carmin, Art Card #2

I’m going to send this one to my niece as it reminds me of her.

Fleur Rouge Carmin II, Art Card #3

Fleur Rouge Carmin II, Art Card #3

Fleur Rouge Carmin #3

Fleur Rouge Carmin III

Rouge Carmin is French for Carmine Red, the color of one of my Prismacolor pencils which matched the pink fabric.

Here is Where the Antelope Play — more Cotton + Steel. Most people would have thrown the antelope scraps away but I sewed them together and added beaded eyes.

Where the Antelope Play

Where the Antelope Play

Orphan Hexagons

Orphan Hexagons

Hexagonal Fun

Hexagonal Fun

And lastly, more Cotton + Steel (the baggie that will not die).

Art Card #7, I Don't Know Jack

Art Card #7, I Don’t Know Jack

I made a birthday card for my sister-in-law. I had made her a wallhanging sometime ago and there were three 2-inch squares of the cherry fabric left so I went with that, drew a flower similar to that on the fabric and added beads.

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Red White & Black All Over

I also made a landscape for another sister-in-law’s birthday and paper pieced a card for my other sister-in-law’s birthday.

Landscape card 5x7

Landscape card 5×7

Paper pieced Card

Paper pieced card

I have been sketching out ideas for more cards but I have enough for abandoning and for little gifts for now. Even so, I need to make special cards for my sisters, daughter and a friend. In the meantime, it’s insomnia week due to the full moon. This is the Nut Full Moon (Cherokee designation). Nuf said.

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Full Moon Series – September (Nut Full Moon)

 

On Growing Up Southren…

…or can you really find yourself if you don’t even know your name?

Now my cousin knew my name alright but she called me Cindy Lou in the South you got to have two names one just ain’t enough honey and you got to address people proper with endearments like darlin’ sugah sweet pea words that drip slip slide outta your mouth like the buttah that runs down your chin from granny mommy’s made from memory biscuits tweren’t no Bisquick in her cupboard.

Well I was born Candace Leigh but it didn’t matter none because when my folks the one a Southern Baptist from Florida Cracker and the other a New England Episcopalian High Church Ma’am converted things started to change as in you must have the name of a proper saint in order to baptize this child and so it came to pass that they baptized me at the age of three Mary after the Blessed Virgin in the name of the Father the Son and the Holy Ghost it was Ghost back then.

Now she was a righteous woman and all sure enough and one should be proud to have such a namesake and I woulda been but I was Candy all my life all the way through the third grade anyway until the nuns saw Mary on the Baptismal certificate and that was all she wrote and that’s why you’ll find Mary at class reunions cause it’s a lot easier than explaining who the hell Candy is. the end.

Present day. So I’ve been trying to reinvent myself so I can rename this blog and I’ve been having a little trouble but my excuse is that I’ve had an identity crisis since I was nine. That’s my story and I’m stickin’ to it. This week has been crazy, and it’s not over yet, but I’ll be back next week with my usual quilting shenanigans. Can you believe that Labor Day has already come and gone? It’s more than half-past summer, folks, and another cool weekend is predicted here. All I can say is, yee-haw.

Losing the light

Losing the light

Easy Threading Needles: A Review

P1060573

Easy-Threading Needles (in alphabetical order)

So I’ve mentioned easy-threading needles before (see my drawing below). I would give you a link to that post, but I’m not sure which one it is. Le sigh. Regardless, I thought that perhaps after buying five different packages of needles, I would be able to guide you toward the best ones. I can’t. I tried out 38 needles. Some had needles that would not thread because there was no opening in the top, causing the thread to break. I can still use the needles if I can actually thread them manually. Here’s a little rundown on defective needles and thread breakage.

Easy Threading Needle

Easy Threading Needle

Thread: I started with Star thread but it broke most of the time so then I used YLI 40wt, Bottom Line 60wt, and Sulky 30wt.

Clover (Japan), shredding, broke the thread 3X out of 15.

Dritz (Czech Republic), shredding, broke the thread 2X out of 18, would not thread 6X/18.

John James (not sure where mfd, inspected in England), two defective needles, less shredding, broke the thread 6X/18. While these were the easiest to thread, the thread kept popping out through the top eye while I was actually hand sewing a project.

Sewology (China), less shredding, thread broke 4X/18. There were no defective needles in this pack, but there were at least three in my last pack and the needles that were working before, no long thread from the top.

Singer (China), the worst for shredding. These needles have only one eye and one needle was broken at that eye, thread broke 10X/18. Freeing the Dial-A-Needle Case from the packaging required scissors and the needles wouldn’t come out because there was tape over the hole, which was not immediately apparent. Aarrgghh.

Conclusion: I have enough easy-threading needles to last me awhile and I’ll keep searching for a better needle. If you know of a high-quality product, please point me in the right direction. Ineedlelittlelove. (Sorry)

Coming soon: Art Abandonment, Automatons, Tidying, Small Projects.

 

 

 

 

 

Divide and Conquer

Flower Power Practice

Flower Power Practice

I took the Divide and Conquer (Creative Quilting for Any Space) class by Lori Kennedy on Craftsy last week. In addition to Flower Power, an all-over free-motion quilting design, I learned some other motifs that you can use in small spaces, borders, or to make a whole-cloth piece.

First I made a thread sampler using some decorative stitches and Lori’s spool motif. I drew the first one with disappearing ink and then did the others without drawing. I marked one thread with an L for being Linty and one as being very Linty as there was lint on my practice piece as I was quilting and not just in the bobbin area when I was finished. I had trouble with the turquoise thread at the end of the day–I just needed to clean the bobbin area and then it sewed correctly.

Thread Sampler

Thread Sampler

Tension problem, back

Tension problem, back

Here is the Square Flower and my variation of the Sun motif. Note that you can use partial motifs in a triangle shape.

Square Leaf and Sun Practice

Square Leaf and Sun Practice

Here are a set of motifs: sun, dashes and dots, sailboat, and waves. I could use a little more practice on those waves. Two ways to practice a new motif: Keep drawing it on paper or use a white board before stitching with thread.

Sun, Dot/Dash, Sailboat, Wave Practice

Sun, Dots and Dashes, Sailboat, Wave Practice

A leaf design with border motifs (paperclip and rickrack).

Leaf, paperclip and rickrack practice

Leaf, paperclip and rickrack practice

The first row shows Lori’s design and I did a variation on the leaf veins after that.

One of the grid work designs involved ribbons and bows but I skipped it as I didn’t think I would use it and instead went on to the medallion motif of Nora Rose with Orange Peel background.

Nora Rose Sampler with orange peel background

Nora Rose Sampler with orange peel background

P.S. I have only finished the first five lessons of this class (there are three more lessons). I will come back to this class in future, which is the beauty of Craftsy. You can continue a class at any time and even repeat it as you wish.

This class is still on sale ($24.99) if you’re interested. Note the date of this post was 8/28/2016, so check for class availability.

http://www.craftsy.com/class/divide-and-conquer-creative-quilting-for-any-space/5259?_ct=sbqii-sqjuweho-dum&_ctp=1&rceId=1472408524172~me5o36hn

Another class I can recommend is Leah Day’s Free-Motion Quilting Sampler. She takes you through making a large sampler quilt and also teaches you how to make and quilt separate blocks (quilt as you go) and then put them together.

http://www.craftsy.com/class/free-motion-quilting-a-sampler/116?_ct=sbqii-sqjuweho-dum&_ctp=9&rceId=1472409366461~9of9xci3

Want more free tutorials and videos for free-motion quilting designs? Go to Lori Kennedy’s and Leah Day’s websites. They’re both on Pinterest as well. Till next time–

http://theinboxjaunt.com/

http://leahday.com/

Tidying Up and Other Shenanigans

I think I’ve mentioned this book, The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo.

https://www.amazon.com/Life-Changing-Magic-Tidying-Decluttering-Organizing/dp/1607747308

Marie Kondo is a rabid declutterer.  Kondo shows us how to get rid of clutter for good. Mostly we move our clutter around and it just comes back. The first step is to get rid of stuff. Kondo has you throw all of your clothes in a pile on the floor, pick each item up and see if it brings you joy. If it doesn’t, it goes in the trash, to Goodwill or Salvation Army or the recycle center. THEN you find a home for whatever items remain. The other trick is to store ALL like items together instead of spread out all over the house. A note about clothes–if this is too overwhelming, start with all of your tops, or all of your pants, (or your underwear). If you’re really overwhelmed, start with all of your socks. Gently fold them and stand them up individually instead of piling them atop each other or rolling the cuffs (ouch).

Winter/holiday sock drawer contents

BEFORE: Winter/holiday sock drawer contents

Winter/holiday socks, gloves

AFTER: Winter/holiday socks, gloves

All my socks in one drawer

All my every day socks in one drawer

Socks, gloves for donation

Unloved socks, gloves for donation

I also have been working on decluttering my studio so the other day I emptied this hanging storage unit in the closet and put everything on my cutting table. I sorted and put all my specialty fabrics back already. My photo disappeared–had an issue with malware again–but here’s the electornics.

Electornics

Electronics

Anyway, why do I save packaging for things and why in the heck do we still have a VHS player (with three tapes). I retrieved all of my camera stuff and it’s all in one place now. My recharging cords are in one place so I can easily find them. I hope to have my dining room table back by the end of the week and everything that remains stored in the TV cabinet.

All the stuff on my cutting table? There are little kits from past quilt retreats, small projects that got stalled, samples from classes and demos I’ve done at quilt guild and just stuff that gets shoved in the closet when I “clean” my studio. I am chipping away at this pile. I finished a hot mitt. It’s going to Goodwill along with the pattern. It’s pretty but it’s so big and bulky and I don’t want to give it, sell it or use it. Perhaps it will bring joy to someone else.

Hot Mitt - finished

Hot Mitt – finished

Here’s an unfinished towel that needs a topper. I thought I could easily  make holes with my wing needle, using the sewing machine, but the holes disappeared so I had to make individual holes as I crocheted on the foundation row. I’ll get back to you with a tutorial on how to crochet a towel topper as soon as I figure out a pattern.

Making holes with wing needle

Making holes with wing needle

I’ve been playing with shisha mirrors. I know that’s redundant as shisha is Indian for mirror. My embroidered one is great, the crocheted one–not so much. Also put one in a yo-yo. I’ll get back to you on this experiment. I’m applying them to a free-motion practice piece.

Shishas

Shishas

Shisha yo-yo

Shisha yo-yo

So that’s my latest adventures. The weather here has finally cooled off but I’m still hitting the treadmill at the gym 3X a week till I use up my gym pass (after Labor Day) then it should be cool enough to get back out on the walking trails. There’s hiking to be done! And new photos to take!

P.S. I’m trying to think up a new name for my blog/website. It’s elusive thus far. Candy and Candy P are already taken. Le sigh. Till next time, be creative and be kind.

 

Whisper of Lilies

My improv piece is finished. Last chapter, I removed the sequined ball because I just didn’t like it. It will land somewhere else eventually–nothing goes to waste.

Sequined wool ball

Sequined wool ball

I found some bits of green crochet thread I had hand dyed at some point and made a small medallion and beaded it with single seed beads.

Beaded crochet medallion

Beaded crochet medallion

Next I added some encrusted beading–my standby of loading three beads at a time close together, knotting after every three groups.

Ecrusted beading

Encrusted beading

I also took the last piece of useable lily fabric and hand appliqued that in a blank space.

Appliqueing last useable piece of lily fabric

Appliqueing last useable piece of lily fabric

Now to finish the edges–I saw this no-binding binding somewhere but couldn’t find it again so did this from memory. I used a 1-inch strip of fabric the length of each side. Stitch it on with 1/4-inch seam allowance, flip it and stay stitch it in place. I meant for the back side of the fabric to show but put right sides together on the second side. Just a reminder–that you pay for two sides of fabric so you can use either side as you see fit.

Finishing side edges

Finishing side edges

Stay stitching

Stay stitching

Press under 1/4-inch and bring the entire flap to the back; blind hem stitch.

Pressing edge under

Pressing edge under

Blind hem stitching

Blind hem stitching

Finished edge

Finished edge

For the bottom edge, I added about 1/2-inch to each end so that I could fold it in and cover up the raw edges on the sides. Note that I trimmed the corner–this gets a little bulky. Blind hem as before.

Bottom edge finishing

Bottom edge finishing

I still have not decided how I will hang this piece, which is approximately 8.25×8-inches so I decided to make a casing at the top for a dowel or branch or something. I cut this strip at 1-1/2 inches and turned under the short edges so that it was slightly shorter than the top width. Blind stitch the long edge, leaving the short edges open.

Top edge casing

Top edge casing

Here is the finished piece: Whisper of Lilies.

Whispers of Lilies

Whispers of Lilies

Give improv piecing a try and then try some different embellishments. When you have a small project, you’re not investing a lot of material or time. If you ruin it, cut it up and make some art pins and abandon them on your favorite walking trail. Check out this Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/ArtAbandonment/

Someone in town is painting rocks that say “Bella Vista Rocks.” I saw one at the hospital parking lot the other day and left it for someone else to find and enjoy! Why? Because I think the article about this project suggested that the rocks were meant for visitors. I belong to the above group but still haven’t decided what to make and abandon. It’s on my bucket list. My bucket overfloweth.

P.S. I tend to think in cartoons and this was going through my mind yesterday. I’m going to use it as a free-motion quilting exercise and see if it turns into something. One never knows, does one? Have a great weekend.

What if flowers were tall?

What if flowers were tall?

 

 

Embellishing fiber art

As promised I’ll take you through the embellishments I have added to my small improv pieced quilt.

Felted balls, drying overnight

Felted balls, drying overnight

I will take you through making a wool ball but so far, I’m not very good at this so search the internet for tutorials. I used two types of wool roving. The first does not felt well for me and the second works better. Note the yellow roving has longer fibers – pull the fibers rather than cutting them.

Pulling strands of wool roving

Pulling strands of wool roving

The green roving is more wooly.

Wool roving

Wool roving

The only other thing you need is hot, soapy water. Basically, you form a loose ball, wet it, gently roll it between your palms until a ball forms and then start applying pressure until the ball becomes dense. My ball looks like brains instead of a smooth ball so I will tell you how I fixed it, somewhat.

Anchoring felted ball

Anchoring felted ball

Anchor the ball to a pincushion. The barbed needle is really sharp and you don’t want to jab your hand with it.

Single barbed needle for felting

Single barbed needle for felting

First I worked the barbed needle into the crevices so that the ball would not fall apart. Then I added some dry roving to make it look smoother. After loosely working roving into the ball, I then used a tool which has five barbed needles.

Adding wool roving

Adding wool roving

Five barbed needle holder

Five barbed needle holder

This helped but I didn’t really like it so I added sequins. I will go back and glue the pins in–otherwise they might work their way out. I think I forgot to mention this little piece of cheesecloth I added yesterday. When I dye fabrics, I add a piece of cheesecloth to the container at the end and get a matching pastel.

Sequined wool ball

Sequined wool ball

Moving on, I added some beading in four different places. First, I stacked three beads on top of each other. Bring the needle up through three beads, skip the top bead and go back down through the bottom two beads.

Stacked beads

Stacked beads

Next, I beaded the little starter/ender using bugle beads with seed beads on either end. You can bead with bugle beads alone but they tend to be sharp on the ends so adding a seed bead to each end helps protect the thread. I made a knot on the reverse after each 3-bead unit.

Bugle and seed beads

Bugle and seed beads

Next I added a small bead with a seed bead. I like to add odd or one of a kind beads from my stash to my projects.

Teardrop and seed bead

Teardrop and seed bead

Lastly, I added some beaded fringe. I took some of the same yarn I had couched down previously, tied a small piece to the middle of a longer piece and tied some large beads on. I attached this unit by sewing through the yarn knot and adding another bead. I generally use Superior Bottom Line thread for beading. Make a rather large knot and when you bury it, tug on it to make sure it is anchored before you start beading. Additionally, I take a few stitches before I start adding beads. Be sure to knot your thread after every three beads if you are adding a lot of beads. That way, if your thread breaks, you’ll only lose three beads and not a whole afternoon’s work.

Beaded fringe

Beaded fringe

These are just some larger, rather ugly beads that worked well for this project.

Next, I made a fabric bead–one of my favorite embellishments. Here is yesterday’s fabric bead, dupioni scraps and copper metallic floss.

Fabric button added

Fabric button added

I learned this technique in Fabric Embellishing, The basics and beyond by Ruth Chandler, Liz Kettle, Heather Thomas and Lauren Vlcek. Look for this book at your library or here:

https://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=fabric+embellishing&tag=mh0b-20&index=stripbooks&hvadid=1695110846&hvqmt=p&hvbmt=bp&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_41u30grn4n_p

You need three fabric scraps, decorative thread, a glue stick and a dowel (1/4-inch).

Fabric 1: 2 x 6 inches

Fabric 2: 1 x 5 inches

Fabric 3: 1/4 x 4 inches

Pieces for fabric bead

Pieces for fabric bead

Dowel and glue stick

Dowel and glue stick

Wrap fabric 1 around the dowel once and put a pin in the fabric.

Mark to start glueing

Mark to start gluing

Glue all of the fabric above the pin on the wrong side. Roll the fabric evenly around the dowel and make sure you have enough glue to secure the ending edge of the fabric. Move the fabric down the dowel just to make sure you haven’t glued it in place.

Glue the entire piece of Fabric 2 on the wrong side, center it and wrap it evenly around. (Sorry I forgot to take pictures–and my hands were full of glue.)

Glue the entire piece of fabric 3 on the wrong side (I used a scrap piece of ribbon here); glue and wrap. (In the first ribbon, I cut Fabric 3 1/2-inch wide).

Now wrap thread around the center and place the bead and dowel in a container to dry overnight. I used organza ribbon instead of thread for this bead. Remove the bead from the dowel and glue to your project. You can wrap wire around your bead, bead it, add micro-beads to the edges or let the edges fray. Make larger or smaller beads by cutting smaller fabrics and using a smaller dowel or a straw.

Finished bead, drying overnight

Finished bead, drying overnight

My project is almost done. I feel like I need to add some hand embroidery and then finish the edges and think of a decorative way to hang it. Now I’m going to spend the rest of the day cleaning my studio because it is one big mess. May all your messes be happy! Till next time–

Almost finished

Almost finished

Improvisational Piecing Tutorial

I thought I would be back to my placemat project by now, but got a little carried away with the leftover scraps so I thought I would do a little tutorial on improvisational piecing. When I cut out a 13-inch circle from my lily fabric, I had a big hole and a lopsided frame. After piecing together my large scraps, this still wasn’t quite large enough to fit inside the circle with a seam allowance so I added three more strips to the center of three sides. I like the way this looked, so pressed down a 1/4-inch seam around the circle cut-out (lily fabric).

Auditioning piecework with lily fabric

Auditioning piecework with lily fabric frame

Adding three more pieces to sides and top

Adding three more pieces to sides and top

A note about improv piecing–you can end up with some bulky seams so use a dressmaker’s tip: steam the seams that need flatting, and press a piece of wood on the damp fabric. I placed an old cutting mat underneath for a firmer surface. I don’t have a professional wood piece so I just used a scrap of wood I had.

Pressing block

Pressing block

I use a wood block but you can see what a professional uses, a tailor’s clapper:

http://www.nancysnotions.com/product/tailors+clapper.do

Next, I centered the pieced circle within the frame with 3/4-inch sequin pins and hand appliqued the edges. I didn’t have any dark purple silk thread so I used Superior Bottom Line–works great for applique. I guess you could call this reverse applique without the work (although it took me several tries to get this pinned evenly)!

Pinned and ready for applique

Pinned and ready for applique

Man in the Moon with Lilies

Man in the Moon with Lilies

And finally, your tutorial on improv piecing. Sometimes, I straighten then edges before piecing, but you don’t have to–just sew them together then trim the seam allowance and press.

Stitch two pieces together, trim

Stitch two pieces together, trim, press

Stitch two more pieces together

Stitch two more pieces together

Nest seams, sew together

Nest seams, sew together

Add another unit

Add another unit

And another

And another

Press toward unpieced unit when possible

Press toward unpieced unit when possible

I trimmed this edge–just too much going on for me to see where to sew.

Trim if there is too much noise

Trim if there is too much noise

I didn’t feel like figuring out how to add a piece to this angle so I just folded the edge under and stitched it to in place. This is called texture and just plain laziness on my part. Whatever works, eh?

Fold under angled edge, stitch

Fold under angled edge, stitch

Stitch down, rather than piecing

Stitch down, rather than piecing, trim away excess

Add a triangle to form a corner

Add a triangle to form a corner

Add some more strips to finish

Add some more strips to finish to desired size

Which way is up?

Which way is up?

How about this?

How about this?

Or this?

Or this?

Actually I’m going with the first one. I thought this was too ugly for a potholder so decided to play around with some embellishing. After quilting in the ditch at almost every stinking seam (I’ll tell you where I learned that next time), I decided to play with couching yarn, beading, and more quilting. I don’t always wait till Friday to have Fun.

But wait, there’s more. I also made a new name tag. TIP: If you round the corners, satin stitching the edge is much easier.

Piece a square from scraps

Piece a square from scraps

Matchstick quilting, rounding the corners

Matchstick quilting, rounding the corners

Satin stitch the edges

Satin stitch the edges

My job here is done. Till next time–

Placemat Tutorial

Keep reading for directions on making a quilted, round placemat with no hand stitching or binding. Last week, I posted about the Too Precious to Cut (But We Will) challenge with my modern quilt guild. The idea is to take a piece of fabric that you have a hard time cutting into

Lily Fabric

Lily Fabric

and do something with it. This is where I left off with the piecing.

Adding a third diagonal strip

Adding a third diagonal strip

I thought this was a boring table runner and decided that I could make more interesting placemats. Since I have a round table, I cut out a 13-inch circle from freezer paper using my Creative Grids Circle Ruler. This ruler must be discontinued–I could not find a link for it so unless you have one, you’ll have to find an alternative way to make a circle template.

Creative Grids Circle Ruler

Creative Grids Circle Ruler

After pressing my freezer paper template onto my pieced work, I used a small rotary cutter to cut out three pieced circles, one whole cloth circle from the leftover piece of lily fabric, four batting circles,and four backing circles. I was able to reuse the freezer paper template. This gets a little tricky for the batting–press from the center out in segments.

CAUTION: I was actually able to cut out the circles keeping my free hand on my hip. If you cannot do this, keep your free hand well away from the rotary cutter as you cut and be sure to close your cutter each time you lay it down. I have known of quilters who have needed a trip to the emergency room because they have cut themselves. More often than not, it is their husbands who don’t believe how sharp these blades are. USE CAUTION.

Rotary Cutter Safety

Rotary Cutter Safety

Next, layer the pieces as follows. Good side of batting facing up, right side of front facing up, right side of backing facing down. Read this five times so you get this layered correctly.

Backing and Top right sides together

Backing and Top right sides together with batting on bottom

Otherwise, you’ll have to do what I did: unstitch, relayer, restitch. It’s a process. I used a half-inch seam allowance, leaving a 4-6-inch opening for turning. Then I trimmed the batting close to the stitching.

Trimming batting

Trimming batting

Finger press the fabric layers where the opening is; this will make closing easier.

Creasing seam allowance at opening

Creasing seam allowance at opening

Next trim the fabric layers with pinking shears. I left a little extra where the opening was so I would have enough fabric to easily turn under.

Pinking edges before turning

Pinking edges before turning

Turn your placemat inside out, smoothing the edge with your fingers. Machine stitch close to the edge. I started at a seam line and then when I got back to the beginning, I stitched in the ditch a few stitches and continued stitching circles, using my presser foot as a guide. This gives you continuous stitching without having to break your threads. As I got toward the center, I had a hard time maintaining the circle shape, ripped out my last two circles and did a free-motion design to finish the center. This is one of my favorite Leah Day designs: Layered Flower, #226.

http://freemotionquilting.blogspot.com/2010/11/day-226-layered-flower.html

Here is the finished placemat after steam pressing.

Placemat 1, Layered Flower variation, Day 226

Placemat 1, Layered Flower variation

I’m playing with the leftover pieces and will probably make a mat for the center of the table. We have a glass table and it’s irritating when salt and pepper shakers, etc., rattle around while you’re eating. If you decide to make your own set of placemats, send me a link. I would love to see them! As always, leave me a comment if you have questions. Till next time, I’ll be in my happy place stitching.

Leftovers

Leftovers

 

 

 

 

 

Quilts, Textiles and Samplers

Today I’ll feature quilts, textiles and needlework from the American Made: Treasures from the American Folk Art Museum (in New York), an exhibit at Crystal Bridges.

American Made Exhibit, floor sign

American Made Exhibit, floor sign

Rising Star Variation Quilt, Elsey A Halstead, 1848

Rising Star Variation Quilt, Elsey A Halstead, 1848, cotton

Sallie Hathaway Needlework Picture, 1784

Sallie Hathaway Needlework Picture, 1784, 12 years of age

Baltimore-Style Album Quilt Top, Artist Unidentified, 1845-1850

Baltimore-Style Album Quilt Top, Artist Unidentified, 1845-1850, cotton with wool embroidery

Baltimore-Style Album Quilt Top, detail

Baltimore-Style Album Quilt Top, detail

Note the individual motifs (some missing) and the obvious deterioration of some fabrics.

Baltimore-Style Album Quilt Top, detail

Baltimore-Style Album Quilt Top, detail

I would guess there was embroidery that has fallen away.

Baltimore-Style Album Quilt Top, detail

Baltimore-Style Album Quilt Top, detail (trapunto)

Slashed Star Quilt, 1872, Sara Maartz

Slashed Star Quilt, 1872, Sara Maartz, cotton, Lancaster,  Pennsylvania

Do Not Touch Sign

Do Not Touch Sign

The ubiquitous Do Not Touch warning. I once had a visitor ask if she could touch a piece of art. She took me rather by surprise and I gave her a resounding, “NO.” Sorry–but better me than one of the docents and you’re barred for life (KIDDING).

Sarah Ann Garges Applique Bedcover, 1853

Sarah Ann Garges Applique Bedcover, 1853, cotton, silk, wool, and wool embroidery

Sarah Ann Garges Applique Bedcover, detail

Sarah Ann Garges Applique Bedcover, detail

Note the dimensional shirt and sleeves.

Crewel Bedcover, 1815-1825, Artist Unidentified

Crewel Bedcover, 1815-1825, Artist Unidentified, New England or New York State, wood with wool embroidery

Crewel Bedcover, detail

Crewel Bedcover, detail

Pieties Quilt, Maria Cadman Hubbard, 1848

Pieties Quilt, Maria Cadman Hubbard (aged 79), 1848, probably Austerlitz, New York, cotton

“If you cannot be a pippin don’t turn crabapple.”

Lucy Low Sampler, 1776, 12 yoa

Lucy Low Sampler, 1776, 12 yoa, silk on linen, Danvers, Massachusetts

My mother lived in Danvers as a child but she wasn’t THAT old.

P1050976

Diamond in the Square Quilt (Artist Unidentified), wool, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Large Eagle (Wilhelm Schimmel), paint on pine, Cumberland County,  Pennsylvania

Whig Rose Quilt, Abigail Hill

Whig Rose Quilt, Abigail Hill, probably Indiana, cotton

Harlequin Medallion Quilt, Artist Unidentified

Harlequin Medallion Quilt, Artist Unidentified, 1800-1820, New England

The fabric is rather unusual, being glazed worsted wools (calimanco), professionally manufactured. The black had a leathery look. We wondered what it would have been like to needle through.

Map Quilt, Artist Unidentified, 1886, possibly Virginia

Map Quilt, Artist Unidentified, 1886, possibly Virginia, silk and cotton with silk embroidery

There was some motif embroidery (spider web), but most embroidery was between states. The date was embroidered in Roman numerals between Oregon and Washington. Note the elongated hexagon piecing.

Tulip and Rose Bouquet Quilt, Elizabeth Schumacher Leece

Tulip and Rose Bouquet Quilt, Elizabeth Schumacher Leece, 1930-45, Kansas City, Missouri, cotton

I could not find out but this is reminiscent of kit quilts by Mountain Mist that were popular around this period.

Centennial Quilt, possibly Gertrde Knappenberger

Centennial Quilt, possibly Gertrde Knappenberger, cotton embroidery

Crystal Bridges often has interactive areas during their exhibits. My friend Sharon and I played with the magnetic quilt pieces and also added to the tapestries on looms. While she was working on one, I added bright wool to the other. I need to get back and see the progress. We also stenciled with colored pencils on a box which we were able to bring home. I still haven’t finished mine.

P1050963

Add to Our Community Loom, Sharon H.

Add to Our Community Loom, Sharon H.

Add to Our Community Loom

Add to Our Community Loom, pink and turquoise wool by Candy P

P1050965

Create a Quilt w/Sharon H.

Create a Quilt w/Sharon H.

Creat a Quilt

Create a Quilt by Candy P

P1060014

Stencilled box, Crayola pencils, by Candy P

I have signed up for the mini-workshop the end of August on Automatons (kinetic objects, as in whirligigs). Watch for my post in early September. Summer is just zipping on by! In the meantime, we may actually get some rain. Rain in parts of Fayetteville yesterday caused flooding up to the car windows leaving most of the rest of us parched! Freaky.